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More Occam's Razor C to Java Translator Theory of Morality II


How charisma gives you the ability to control other people

Abstract

This article explains how people with high charisma can control (or possibly just influence) other people with lower charisma, especially younger people or other people who don't know many people. Einstein's apparent lack of charisma is also discussed. Finally, I speculate on whether or not a high charisma individual can defeat their selfish gene.

1. Forcing to behave

Young people are free to behave immorally so long as their parents or caregivers don't find out about it, since they have no-one to prevent them from behaving in this way. As people get older and come to know more people, the principle of honesty constrains them to behave in a way that is acceptable to all of the people they know and therefore they must behave in a moral manner. Examples of this forcing include:

Charisma is the ability that a person has to get other people to follow you and therefore a person with high charisma has a lower probability of being harmed by other people. See an earlier article entitled a consequentialist theory of morality for why this is so. People in history with high charisma include the following:

The above mentioned people are characterised by their distinctive appearance and the fact that they have many people under them (as so-called underlings), the underlings doing work for the high charisma individual or the high charisma individual representing those underlings in some kind of political system. They look distinctive because they are popular enough to look different in spite if their position of power. I believe that if Christ was alive today he would believe in a personal God but he would also be a scientist. The Bible was written in a pre-scientific age so it explains why Jesus was not a scientist because science did not exist in Christ's time.


If a person with high charisma engages in a young person with low charisma and who knows fewer people, then they too are also forced to behave in the same moral manner that is mentioned above. Examples of forms of engagement include the following:

The reason for this forcing is that low charisma individuals are afraid of being harmed by that high charisma individual if they don't behave in a moral manner. That is to say in the language of my other article they have a significant probability of being harmed by the high charisma individual. People with high charisma and therefore high ability to control people gravitate towards the paid position of being an employer over people with lesser charisma. People tend to gravitate towards other people with high charisma and/or intelligence. This was true of me where during my time as a mathematics student I gravitated towards my mathematics classmates: Michael Burns, Diane Maclagan and Tim Sturge who where all of high intelligence. The same happens to me with people who I tutor in Computer Science.

2. Applying my abilities

Given that I have this ability to control other people, I would like to apply this ability to practical situations, such as working with at-risk youth. I believe that I would do a good job in this field of employment. If you the reader are from Christchurch and could help me enter into this vocation then please phone me at my home phone number: 335-0297.

3. Einstein's apparent lack of charisma

I believe that Einstein was of high intelligence but not especially high charisma. Evidence to support this can be found in the fact that he appeared to believe that how you look is unimportant. People with high charisma are popular enough to look different and therefore can dress to match this so that when they engage with other people, the level of engagement is higher, and therefore their ability to control other people is greater.

Because Einstein's intelligence was but his charisma was not excessive, it seems likely that this explains why Einstein did not believe in a personal God. A person with high charisma is like a God to persons of lower charisma. God is to a high charisma person what a high charisma person is to a person with lower charisma. Therefore a person with high charisma believes in a personal God but a person with low charisma doesn't believe in one.

Because I have higher charisma than Einstein, I believe that in this way I am superior to Einstein. This is not saying as much as you would think because (almost) everybody has something that they can do better than anyone else, and therefore everybody is superior to Einstein in some way.

4. On the need for a partner

If is interesting to speculate whether or not a person with high charisma needs to have a (possibly sexual) partner and therefore defeat their selfish gene. See my earlier article about the rationality of romantic love. Jesus, Hitler and Ghandi didn't and Lincoln (like Bill Clinton) possibly only did it to appeal to the popular vote: a person with monogamous long-term relationship is more amenable to popular vote than a single person or an adulterer. It is possibly true that individuals with high-charisma combat loneliness by socialising with underlings. More work is needed to establish this idea as fact.

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| Political Activism | Bob Dylan Quotes+ | My Life Story | Smoking Cessation | Other Links |
| Debugging Macros | String Class I | Linked List System I | Java for C Programmers | Naming Convention |
| String Class II | How I use m4 | Strings III | Symmetrical I/O | Linked Lists II |
| Run-Time Type Info | Virtual Methods | An Array System | Science & Religion | Submodes |
| Nested Packages | Memory Leaks | Garbage Collection | Internet & Poverty | What is Knowledge? |
| Limits of Evolution | Emacs Additions | Function Plotter | Romantic Love | The Next Big Thing |
| Science Fiction | Faster Compilation | Theory of Morality | Elisp Scoping | Elisp Advice |
| S.O.G.M. Pattern | Safe Properties | School Bullying | Charisma Control | Life and Death |
| Splitting Java | Multiple Ctors | Religious Beliefs | Conversation 1 | Conversation 2 |
| J.T.W. Language | Emacs Additions II | Build Counter | Relation Plotter | Lisp++ Language |
| Memory Leaks II | Super Constructors | CRUD Implementation | Order a Website Form | There Is An Afterlife |
| More Occam's Razor | C to Java Translator | Theory of Morality II
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