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How to use Davin’s full version of GNU Emacs

For the purpose of this course it is required that you have installed the GNU Emacs text editor. Even if you don't use GNU Emacs as your editor, GNU Emacs is needed to build *.java files from *.jtw files For more detailed tutorials on how to use Emacs, simply press F1 inside Emacs. A small caveat applies to the on-line documentation accessed via the F1 command: it explains how to use vanilla Emacs, i.e. a version that does not use my extensive customisations. I have also simplified some of the terminology from the on-line manuals.


Challenge to you: If you don’t like any of the following keybindings then most of them can be redefined to whatever you prefer.

Windows-Style Key Bindings

Emacs does not support Windows-style key bindings by default, but I have altered my version of Emacs so that it does support the following Windows-standard key bindings:


Control-oOpen file. Similar to Control-f but opens a Windows file dialog box. Not as fast as Control-f and cannot be used to open folders.
Control-xCut a region of text.
Control-cCopy a region of text.
Control-vPaste a region of text.
Control-zUndo / Redo the last change.
Shift-Up or Shift-DownMarks a region of text
DeleteWhile a region is highlighted, deletes that region

Other Important Key Bindings

.
Control-f or Control-dFind/Open/Load file or folder.
Control-x Control-sSave currently edited file.
Control-x sSave some files (yes or no per file).
Control-x Control-wSave the current file as a different file name. Note that you will be prompted for the file name
Control-x kKill the current file (asks to confirm if the current file hasn’t been saved).
InsertElectric buffers menu (Note: Buffer ≈ File). (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!) The F12 key also does the same thing. One common usage of the Electric Buffers Menu is to toggle between the current and the next-to-current file using the key sequence Insert Insert. Note that the Buffers Menu at the top of the screen does a similar thing.
Control-sIncremental Search forward.
Control-rIncremental Reverse search.
Alt-% actually Alt-Shift-5Search and Replace.
Alt-* actually Alt-Shift-8Regexp search and replace.
Alt-/Automatically complete abbreviation. (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!)
Esc Esc Esc or Control-gAbort current command and widen narrowed buffer.
Control-x Control-qQuit Emacs (More simply just press the close button on the top right hand corner of the screen).

Function Key Bindings

F1Online help.
Shift F1Copy the contents of the current buffer to the clipboard.
F2Save all buffers that you are currently editing (no questions asked).
F3Save and delete non-essential buffers (no questions asked). This is useful when you are editing a whole bunch of files and you wish to purge them all to disk.
F4Widen (the opposite of Control-2 and Control-3).
F5 or Control-Alt-\Automatically indents the whole buffer (see tutorial 2).
F6Opens a file using the Windows open file dialog box. This is the same as the key sequence Control-o.
F7Toggles the current file’s read-only status. Note that files in the output folder are set to be read-only by default. This device is intended to protect the user from editing files that they shouldn’t be editing. If you really want to edit a file that you shouldn’t simply press this key and it opens up the possibility of editing that file.
F8Undo / Redo.
F9Compile using the last compile command.
Control-F9 or Alt-F9 or Shift-F9Compile and edit the command line.
Shift F11Auto complete file name. (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!) Note that F11 by itself is bound under Lubuntu to toggle maximisation of the current window.
F12Electric buffers menu. (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!) The Insert key also does the same thing. One common usage of the Electric Buffers Menu is to toggle between the current and the next-to-current file using the key sequence F12 F12.

Miscellaneous Key Bindings

Alt-uChange current word to uppercase.
Alt-lChange current word to lowercase.
Alt-cCapitalise current word.
Alt-qReformat paragraph to the width of the current value of the fill-column variable.

Cutting and Pasting Text I

Control-kKill line and append to last kill.
Control-yYank last kill.
Alt-y , immediately following Control-ysearches killed text. Each time you press this key it goes back one step through the "kill ring".
Control-Backspace or Alt-BackspaceBackward delete word. (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!)
Control-Delete or Alt-DeleteForward delete word. (Once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever got by without it!)

Cutting and Pasting Text II

Control-SpacePush mark onto stack.
Shift-SpacePop mark off stack.
Control-x Control-xSwap mark and point.
Control-wCut region between mark and point.
Alt-wCopy region between mark and point.

Splitting and Merging Windows

Control-0Delete this window.
Control-1 or F4Delete all other windows.
Control-2Split window vertically.
Control-3Split window horizontally.
Control-TabOther window.

Navigating the Emacs Online "Info" Help System

Note that the Emacs Info help system is operated much like a web browser.

nNext Info Page.
pPrevious Info Page.
lLast Info Page (same as the back button on a web browser).
rSame as the forward button on a web browser.
dReturns to the main Directory of all info pages, much like to home button on a web browser.

Useful Keys for Debugging H.T.M.L. Documents

Alt-;Toggles tags (see Webdesign Tutorial 1).
Control-Left or Alt-Left
Control-Right or Alt-Right
Finds matching bracket < > ( ) [ ] { } (see Webdesign Tutorial 1).
Alt-x testlinks EnterDebugs broken links (see Webdesign Tutorial 2).
TABAutomatically indents the current line (see Webdesign Tutorial 3).
F5 or Control-Alt-\Automatically indents the whole buffer (see Webdesign Tutorial 3).
Alt-x weblint EnterRun the external program weblint to debug H.T.M.L. (see tutorial Webdesign Tutorial 3.)


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| Email Address | Computer Games | Web Design | Java Training Wheels | The Fly (A Story) |
| Political Activism | Bob Dylan Quotes+ | My Life Story | Smoking Cessation | Other Links |
| Tutorial 1 | Tutorial 2 | Tutorial 3 | Tutorial 4 | Tutorial 5 |
| Tutorial 6 | Tutorial 7 | Tutorial 8 | Tutorial 9 | Tutorial 10 |
| Tutorial 11 | Tutorial 12 | Tutorial 13 | Tutorial 14 | Tutorial 15 |
| Tutorial 16 | Tutorial 17 | Tutorial 18 | Using Emacs | Download Links
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